Veni Sancte Spiritus

Grew up Roman Catholic.

Left the church many years ago.

Spiritual practices here really have had nothing to do with the Western traditions since.

A few weeks ago, heard a friendly acquaintance of mine give an amazing talk on how Christianity had touched his life, the Christian practices he had observed, Christian experiences, especially involving the Holy Spirit.

This talk sent me down a few lines of inquiry:

  • How am I relating to the tradition I was born in to ?
  • Specifically, how am I relating to the Holy Spirit ? ( a big part of the talk involved the Holy Spirit)

The answer to the first question: I am relating poorly to the tradition of my birth.

In a very general way, spiritual types fall somewhere on the continuum between the devotee ( bhakta) and the seeker of insight ( jnana ).

The flavor of Christianity I grew up in as I then knew it was heavy on the devotion side. I failed to develop much devotion, and when I left Christianity, it was with relief that maybe there was a completely other way that I could “practice” and “make progress” with. (them’s jnana words for sure (sic))

Oddly, for the first time in my life, I felt that I knew what God wanted me to do, specifically, to start practicing Buddhism. The turn to another path opened up to many jnana-friendly practices, such as meditation, to which this disposition was much better suited.

I never forgave Christianity for letting me down, and then “blaming me” for my failure.

Not God. Not Jesus. Not the Holy Spirit. Christianity itself: the religious system that people built and ran for all these many centuries.

This was a bit of a surprise, as are most of these hurts when suddenly unearthed.

It sounds absurd on examination: only we blame ourselves. Nonetheless, there it was.

So, seeing the stuck energy for what it was, feeling the old hurt, forgiving self, forgiving other, releasing everything, and it was finished.

A previously hidden chunk of dualistic appearance disappeared from this perception.

The answer to the second question turned out much more open and interesting.

Experiences at Catholic Mass of strong energetic shifts around the altar when the Holy Spirit is invoked ( part of the liturgy ) are a palpable, beautiful and resonant experience of something indefinable, both powerful and subtle.

Other experiences of energetic fields around Catholic relics or in chapels I have attributed to the Holy Spirit aspect of the Triune God; the active principle in the physical world that supports those who call upon it.

Not feeling that I had given the Holy Spirit a fair shake when I was a Christian, I began practicing a mantra to the Holy Spirit;” Veni Sancte Spiritus “= Come, Holy Spirit ! focusing on the heart chakra while so practicing.

In meditation. Veni Sancte Spiritus!

All throughout the day. Veni Sancte Spiritus!

Falling asleep at night. Veni Sancte Spiritus!

How beautiful !

A remarkable softness emerged out of the empty spaciousness, centered in the heart chakra.

Veni Sancte Spiritus!

Perhaps I found a spark of devotion after all.

Veni Sancte Spiritus Chant

Photo #1 from here.

Photo #2 from here.

About dominic724

A former seeker starts blogging.
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2 Responses to Veni Sancte Spiritus

  1. David Belcheff says:

    Rejoicing in your focusing your broad and deep attention upon absorption with the divine.  Last night we were trying to hook up the big TV in one of the buildings to watch Hamilton with Nancy (t’s mom) and Shabri, one of the devotees closest to Gurudeva, who told us that he was going to come down from the Himalayas c. 1950 to visit a sadhu named Ramana Maharshi, but that Maharshi passed away before he could get there. So we googled the following documentary and got sucked into it and since we couldn’t get Disney plus to work watched it instead: Sri Ramana Maharshi Full Documentary in English

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    | | | | Sri Ramana Maharshi Full Documentary in English

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    With kind regards,David Belcheff

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